Cape Canaveral Lawn Care and Landscaping Projects

Mexican petunias

Mexican petunias

Rejuvenation on Grant Avenue

This small beachside home, constructed in the late fifties, included a triangular shaped bed formed by the front walkway on one side, the driveway on another side, and the front stoop on another. The bed had originally contained a dense snarl of asparagus fern. The owner contacted Mowgirl Lawn Care in hopes that we could remove the offensive ground cover and replace it with something less hostile (as in NO THORNS) and more colorful. Our landscape rejuvenation began with cutting the asparagus fern back as far as possible. In this way we’d lessen our chances of getting impaled by the thousands of tiny thorns. We then searched the bed for any irrigation pipes or electrical wires. Once satisfied that there were none, the digging began. We removed the ferns and their elaborate network of roots and tubers. With a steel rake we sifted through the soil in search of any remaining tubers. I selected Mexican petunia (Ruellia simplex) as a replacement plant for several reasons. First, due to the extremely invasive nature of the plant, the existing triangular bed was perfectly suited to contain it. Surrounded by concrete, the Mexican petunia could thrive and propagate to its heart’s content! It wasn’t going anywhere. Next, the plant is incredibly hardy, able to withstand drought and pests. And lastly, the purple flowers of the Mexican petunia are abundant and in constant bloom. There is always color to enjoy. We installed the new plants and made sure they had plenty of moisture. Within a few short weeks the brilliant patch of purple enhanced not only the landscape, but the entire front lawn as well.

Lawn Maintenance and Repair at Casa Del Mar Condos

Casa del Mar in Cape Canaveral hired Mowgirl Lawn Care to not only take over the lawn mowing duties, but to also enhance the existing lawn. What once had been a thick carpet of St. Augustine sod had decayed to an amalgamation of sand spurs and weeds. There were still several healthy patches of St. Augustine, so it was our intent to create a healthy soil environment to coax the floratam into crawling and spreading. We began by digging out the sand spurs (Cenchrus). The only foolproof method of eradicating these little buggers is through deliberate and thorough removal of the plant and spurs above ground, and the root system below. One must also be careful not to allow the seed pods (spurs) to fall back into the soil and propagate! So we very carefully pried each cluster from the earth, and gently placed them into an awaiting trash barrel. With that out of the way, we applied weed killer to any weeds not surrounded by St. Augustine. Weed killer will kill any plant life it contacts, and we certainly didn’t want to kill the small amount of healthy grass we had to work with.

Grass plugs

Grass plugs

Weeds embedded in the St. Augustine had to be removed by hand. Finally, we inserted floratam grass plugs in the bare earth, a maximum of 12” apart. Making certain to keep the grass plugs watered is the trick. Once the plugs are established (3 weeks), watering can is decreased. The eventual result of this painstaking effort was a lush field of verdant St. Augustine grass.